Streetbeat originally published Oct. 9, 2008

Creacy Cotton

“Sometimes they seem like it. On the other hand, the criminals just move to different locations.”

Kathryn Redmond

“It might be of help in some areas, but for the most part the criminal activity already knows where the lights are, and they just go around the corner or another block.”

Juanita Rutues

“They could be a good thing, but if they are actually functional, we have not been given any of that information back at any of the CAPS meetings or any of the hearings I’ve attended. But the young men and women are so wise, these cameras to me are not beneficial unless they are right at the time to capture them. Usually the people are around the corner. They know to hide in a way those cameras cannot see. So to me, it’s good deterrent if you’re standing on the corner trying to do something, but if they are around the corner, then you can’t see them. They can stand 15 doors down on a side street and do whatever they want and no one will know it. The cameras can’t go around the corner, so to me they are not beneficial. We could use that money in other ways.”

Dorothy Daniel

“There is a camera at the corner of Madison and Lockwood and three doors down, the drug dealers are selling their goods like it is Walgreen’s. I think it is terrible because they are running up and down the street, but who can see it? What are the cameras doing? They know those cameras aren’t doing anything. This is the reason they continue to do these activities. And cutting down on the police isn’t good. We don’t have enough right now in the areas because you need someone stationed some place on top of the building or something to cut this down.”

Mary Clay

“As fast they put the cameras up, the criminals just move somewhere else. So they are pretty good in one way and in other ways they are not. We don’t know what the effect is.”